“Here We Are Now” is out March 18, 2014 From It Books/Harper Collins

I have a new book titled “Here We Are Now” which is out officially on March 18, 2014 from It Books/Harper Collins. The book is an attempt to chronicle, and measure, the cultural impact of Nirvana‘s Kurt Cobain twenty years after his death. The book explores the scope of Cobain’s lasting influence in music, fashion, culture, in Seattle itself, and among the addiction and recovery communities. And in contrast to my “Heavier Than Heaven” biography of Cobain, this book is first-person and at times full of analysis and opinion. The book details where I was when I first heard the grim news of Kurt’s death — a moment that anyone who loved music, loved Nirvana, and lived in Seattle then, will remember forever.Though this is mostly a book of cultural analysis — with some hilarious discourse on Kurt’s impact on fashion, and, of all things, hip hop music — there is also some new reporting in it. For one of the first times in print, the true statistics of how Cobain’s suicide affected copycats, and suicide rates are disclosed. The book also looks at how Kurt’s death and struggles with addiction play a part in the treatment models in recovery programs today.Music fans in the U.K. recently ranked the line “Here we are now, entertain us,” from “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” as the third-greatest song lyric in all of music history. What my book “Here You Are Now” seeks to do is reinterpret that lyric into a statement of where “we,” as a collected body of fans, are now two decades after Kurt’s death. How can we measure his life, his impact, and how did his twenty seven years on this earth leave culture?

Photo: I have a new book titled "Here We Are Now" which is out officially on March 18, 2014 from It Books/Harper Collins. The book is an attempt to chronicle, and measure, the cultural impact of Nirvana's Kurt Cobain twenty years after his death. The book explores the scope of Cobain’s lasting influence in music, fashion, culture, in Seattle itself, and among the addiction and recovery communities. And in contrast to my "Heavier Than Heaven" biography of Cobain, this book is first-person and at times full of analysis and opinion. The book details where I was when I first heard the grim news of Kurt's death — a moment that anyone who loved music, loved Nirvana, and lived in Seattle then, will remember forever. </p><br />
<p>Though this is mostly a book of cultural analysis — with some hilarious discourse on Kurt's impact on fashion, and, of all things, hip hop music — there is also some new reporting in it. For one of the first times in print, the true statistics of how Cobain's suicide affected copycats, and suicide rates are disclosed. The book also looks at how Kurt's death and struggles with addiction play a part in the treatment models in recovery programs today. </p><br />
<p>Music fans in the U.K. recently ranked the line “Here we are now, entertain us,” from "Smells Like Teen Spirit," as the third-greatest song lyric in all of music history. What my book "Here You Are Now" seeks to do is reinterpret that lyric into a statement of where "we," as a collected body of fans, are now two decades after Kurt’s death. How can we measure his life, his impact, and how did his twenty years on this earth leave culture?

Leave a Reply